Bill Livers Celebration and Progress Red Hot String Band Reunion
Jun
14
7:00 PM19:00

Bill Livers Celebration and Progress Red Hot String Band Reunion

The entire cast of the Progress Red Hot String Band and the Bill Livers String Ensemble will be in town to celebrate the legacy of Bill Livers and the fun we had playing in Lexington in the 1970s and 80s. Joining the reunion will be our current bands - Kentucky Wild Horse, the Peach Pie Band, and Larry Green. Following the performances there will be an open old time jam.

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Kentucky Women's Voices
Apr
13
7:00 PM19:00

Kentucky Women's Voices

Join us for an evening of original music and writings from four decades of Kentucky women, singing and musing about home, the land, social justice, politics, the environment, and other matters close to the heart. The performance will take place at The Kentucky School, Lexington's new home for music and culture.

Performers include Carla Gover, Tiffany Williams, Jeri Katherine Howell, Zoe Barrett, Maizie Barrett, & Bobi Conn.

Tickets are $15. Purchase tickets here. Space is limited, so act fast!

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Outside the Spotlight Jazz Series: Friends & Neighbors
Apr
6
7:00 PM19:00

Outside the Spotlight Jazz Series: Friends & Neighbors

Outside the Spotlight / Event 209

FRIENDS & NEIGHBORS (from Norway)
* Thomas Johansson – trumpet
* André Roligheten – tenor saxophone/clarinets
* Oscar Grönberg - piano
* Jon Rune Strøm – double bass
* Tollef Østvang – drums

Saturday, April 6 @ The Kentucky School
show starts at 7pm
admission = FREE, all ages welcome
sponsored by WRFL 88.1FM, UK's student-run radio station - wrfl.fm

part of the Outside the Spotlight jazz and improvised music series - bringing out-sounds to Lexington since 2002

"Friends & Neighbors, the young neo-free-jazz band from Norway, takes its name from Ornette Coleman's 1970 album of the same name. The spirit behind the phrase suits the quintet beautifully, and in terms of both historical stylistic precedent and a certain, strong and palpable ensemble identity - a a friendly, neighborly, and collective musical persona. That group-think, along with bold individualism of the parties involved, comes through loud and clear, with blissful wisps of heartwarming anarchy ..." - Downbeat Magazine, from review of Friends & Neighbors' record "Hymn for a Hungry Nation"

More info ~ http://www.friendsandneighbors.no
Sounds & Sights ~
https://open.spotify.com/album/37bx767VR1s3QXCOrcXePY
https://youtu.be/n9L-LSqoYos

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Tatsuya Nakatani & Dave Farris
Mar
27
8:00 PM20:00

Tatsuya Nakatani & Dave Farris

Two Master Percussionists and Avant-Garde Pioneers:

Tatsuya Nakatani - mind-bending improvisation and earth-shattering bowed gongs
http://tatsuyanakatani.com/

Dave Farris - the freshest, the funkiest, and the farthest-out
https://italianbeaches.bandcamp.com/

Each will perform a solo set, then the pair will collaborate to live score David Andree’s experimental video, "New Sight."

“Inspired by accounts of blind individuals gaining their sight later in life, the video work explores the interplay of light, shape, and movement as it fluctuates between abstraction and recognizable form.

Traditional lenses are not used in favor of exploring more direct manipulations of light. Using the body to focus light allows for the aperture to fluctuate in real time, allowing in more or less light, much like our own eyes do. This produces effects that are reminiscent of how it feels to open your eyes first thing in the morning or to squint at a bright light. Mirrors are used to redirect light, creating multiple viewpoints, and layers visuals in real time, further complicating the immediate comprehension of visual information."

The Kentucky School (formerly Al's Sidecar)
$5-$10 sliding scale as you are able

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The Other Years
Feb
28
6:00 PM18:00

The Other Years

The Other Years are Anna Krippenstapel and Heather Summers — two voices riding a single harmonic laser beam, carrying instruments made of wood and skin and bones. They travel light. 

There is something pure and strong and ancient in their voices. It reminds people of Jean Ritchie or Hazel Dickens or Karen Dalton. The Other Years are time-travelers — but not from the past. They come from the future with songs about how we’re all gonna get through these days. 

Fiddle, guitar, banjo, and two human voices. Sometimes Heather and Anna sing together, sometimes they trade off. They leave plenty of space for notes to ring out and words to sink in. Maybe you feel like crying. Beautiful things can cause that. 

“There is no evil, there is human / That river don’t hate, it just does what it's doing” 

Their recent debut self-titled album was recorded over three spring days at a cabin outside Louisville, Kentucky. Daniel Martin Moore was the engineer. Anna is Joan Shelley’s longtime fiddle player. The Other Years is Heather’s first band. She’s a spark. There’s plenty of Kentucky cross-pollinating going on. Anna also plays with Freakwater. Louisville’s Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy has asked The Other Years to tour with him this fall. 

In cars and in kitchens and around Old-time music festival campfires, Heather and Anna have been singing together for ten years. Born three days apart – not blood kin, but hatched from neighboring eggs — their voices lock together with a Sara and Maybelle Carter or Everly Brothers sympathetic vibration. It’s a sonic convergence that contains more than the individual notes the two are singing — a Sacred Harp “hollow square” where chords are made from the space between the notes. This is a mysterious thing, like splitting an atom or finding infinity in the distance from one to zero. 

“Hope is a choice, love has a voice / It’s not the leaves or the branches, but the whisper in between” 

Their versions of the Appalachian murder ballad “Fair Ellen” — learned from a Jean Ritchie recording — and Michael Hurley’s “Wildegeeses” are stunning. There is sorrow and loss in these songs, but there is joy in the singing of them. Michael Hurley is a fan. Heather and Anna probably wouldn’t want to say that, but it’s ok. 

The Other Years are farmers — heartbreaking, hopeful, plowing through the newly-turned earth. Their voices and instruments bend together like plants leaning towards the sun. Names of trees and animals are spoken like incantations. They know how to harvest an acre of sorghum, boil it down and pour it off into a jar — reduce it to its essence. This is what endures. 

This is The Other Years. They come from the future. It’s gonna be beautiful. 

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